Physiotherapist Offers Advice on posture when working from home

 

Bupa Physio Adam Byrne suggests that since lockdown 11 million people have suffered aches and pains due to working from home. I’m presuming this is a UK-only figure. Apparently their study found that only a third have a dedicated workstation. The article says this leaves many working from sofas, beds and even beanbags. I can back this up by personal experience, many of the people taking my posture coaching sessions are working in frankly horrendous positions. 

 Just checking, you, yes you there, is your posture OK right now? Hmmm? OK, let’s continue…

Adam has a point. It’s absolutely vital that you get your home working environment set up well. Ergonomically well, and well in terms of work-life balance. Many of use are now working from home and despite the complaints of people going into the office, most people working from home are actually working harder than they did in the office. This is because there are fewer reasons to step away from the screen.

No reason to walk over to another desk, No gossip to be had by the water-cooler. And that’s not even mentioning the everlasting Zoom meetings, so much more uncomfortable sat in front of laptop than they would be face-to-face! I’m seeing a lot of people complaining about their necks after sitting for two or more hours on video-conferences. If you host these, make sure to schedule in some breaks or your staff are going to be complaining! I’d say 40 minutes is a good long time, so get used to introducing 5 minute breaks for stretching, resting the eyes, and ‘water-in, water-out’!  

But let’s face it folks, if you’re working on a beanbag you’ve got a problem. A real problem. Fix that now!

While working from home, people may find their setup doesn’t offer them the same level of support they have in the office. If sitting at their kitchen chair or on their sofa, employees may develop bad posture which may result in neck pain, shoulder tension and often recurring headaches Adam Byrne, Physiotherapist offers advice on posture on Bdaily

Adam suggests this is leading to neck pain, shoulder tension and recurring headaches.
Let’s face it, things are only going to get worse for these people if they continue working like that. I hope you aren’t one of them!

These common signs of bad posture are highlighted: Slumped shoulders | Neck pain | Recurring headaches | Back pain | And tilted pelvis.

Physiotherapist Offers Advice on Posture

Adam offers suggestions including many of our favourites: Stretches | Exercise | Seeking professional help | Sitting well | And strengthening the glutes. We like this because Adam suggests a rounded approach, which we feel works a lot better than simply declaring that one stretch or exercise will solve all your problems!

I don’t know about you, but getting away from the screen, even just for a little stretch, would do us all the world of good. Why not take a moment to back away and have a nice stretch now? When a physiotherapist offers advice on posture, it’s worth listening… Go on, permission is granted!

All good advice, I’m pleased to say, from Adam. You can find the full posture article here.