This weeks posture news has a couple of great posts online with video from DJ Chris Moyles and great photos from Vulcan website, with a couple of articles featured by physio’s and Dr’s promoting good posture too…

 

UK radio dj’s show video of posture corrector 

 

Radio X’s DJ Chris Moyles  Pippa demonstrated her new posture corrector brace, which goes on like a backpack. It’s a short video and a bit lewd but I have to say it made me laugh. You can see it here.

 

Supportive seat cushion on Kickstarter at $49 shown on website mentalfloss.com

Physio Paul Gough has some tips for readers in a local newspaper on improving their posture to avoid back pain at work. Tips include:

  • Don’t underestimate the power of good posture
  • Keep your body in good alignment, whether sitting or standing stay up straight
  • Get up and move every half hour or so to stretch or walk around
  • Use props like footrests, back supports, or even a pillow.
  • And using a combination of the above in the long term for the best results.

Nothing groundbreaking there, but a good all-over approach to posture at work. 

Tech lifestyle website Vulcan has some really cool pics of their staff being assessed in pictures by ergonomic furniture designer Tan Dale – it’s worth a look as it’s a funny and educative post.

San Diego Entertainer Magazine offers it’s own simple tips for better posture:

  • Straighten up
  • Eliminate desk slump
  • Sit close to your steering wheel
  • Do core work
  • Learn to breathe properly
  • Hold devices properly
  • And adjust your workstation to fit you. 

Again, nothing groundbreaking there, but it’s good to hear breathing and how you hold your devices getting a mention.

And finally

A doctor warns that platform shoes are terrible for your ankles, feet and overall posture.

Shock news! Your footwear affects your posture.

New York doctor Dr. Hillary Brenner laments the rigid soles which can throw off the wearer’s gait and posture and risk sprains. She states that 30 to 40 percent of people with simple ankle sprains develop chronic long-term joint pathology.

You have been warned! 

That’s all for now, see you soon,

James.